Laudato Si – some good news stories regarding our beautiful environment

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It is likely that each of us is aware of small local gestures of love and care towards the environment and to those most immediately dependent on it. In the recent encyclical Laudato Si, Pope Francis reminds us that each individual must play their part in addressing climate change. He calls on governments and multinationals to take a lead, and he warns against ‘a false or superficial ecology which bolsters complacency'[LS 59].

Pope Francis also acknowledges that there are positive steps, some of which are significant and which give testimony to the fact that positive intervention is a possibility.

In some countries, there are positive examples of environmental improvement: rivers, polluted for decades, have been cleaned up; native woodlands have been restored; landscapes have been beautified thanks to environmental renewal projects; beautiful buildings have been erected; advances have been made in the production of non-polluting energy and in the improvement of public transportation. These achievements do not solve global problems, but they do show that men and women are still capable of intervening positively. For all our limitations, gestures of generosity, solidarity and care cannot but well up within us, since we were made for love. [LS 58]

I would like to pick out just three recent good news stories that have appeared in the last week here in the UK – maybe you have others that you could add.

lego

LEGO 

‘By the end of 2016, the company will establish a Lego Sustainable Materials Centre at the Lego headquarters in Billund, Denmark, with the aim to be manufacturing both the Lego toys and its packaging in sustainable materials by 2030.’ [cnet]

A more sustainable toy – Lego announces its intention to get rid of petroleum based plastics

Toys such as Lego are essentially luxury goods. The market for them is driven by branding and advertising. The decision to make a radical move towards sustainability probably indicates not only increasingly responsible manufacturing targets but also a growing pressure from consumers to buy sustainable products.

FRACKING

A tiny hamlet in Lancashire, NW UK has won a significant battle in its campaign to prevent fracking in the local area. Little Plumpton has just 13 residents. In an area where employment is limited and fracking could boost the economy, locals and others from across the region have mounted a determined campaign which has at least temporarily halted the proposed site.

The Chief executive of the Lancashire Chamber for Commerce, supported by Cuadrilla said “In turning down this proposal, councillors appear to have ruled with their hearts, rather than their heads, and ignored the reasoned arguments of those with genuine expertise in this industry. She said it was “bad news for local businesses”. The ‘no’ campaign has largely centered around the environmental impact of the proposed site.

NAOMI KLEIN 

Naomi Klein, a leading social activist and critic of capitalism will join Cardinal Turcson in leading a conference on the climate hosted by the Vatican.’Pope Francis recruits Naomi Klein in climate change battle’

This collaborative approach to the debate, and the engagement between the moral, ethical, spiritual and scientific aspects can only be positive. The debate on the environment ‘cries out for a moral voice’ [N Klein]

 “The fact that they invited me indicates they’re not backing down from the fight. A lot of people have patted the pope on the head, but said he’s wrong on the economics. I think he’s right on the economics,” she said, referring to Pope Francis’s recent publication of an encyclical on the environment. [N Klein]

She went on to say that ‘the pope’s position as a “moral voice” in the world – and leader of 1.2 billion Catholics – gives him the unique ability to unite campaigners fighting for a common goal.’.

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